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THE
B'nai B rith Magazine
The National Jewish Monthly
VOLUME XLI JUNE, 1927 NUMBER 9
Contents
Editorials ............................................................................... 367
A Cross-Section of Jewish Life...................................... 370
Districts Race for Half-Way Mark in Wider Scope
Campaign .............................................. r......................... 372
Thinking Aloud — By Urva Porah.................................. 374
The Holy City of Frankfurt — By E. David Goitein.. 375
In the Public Eye................................................................ 377
Louis Lozowick — By Yossef Gaer.................................... 378
News in Views....................................................................... 380
Wayfaring in Provence (Part I)— By Israel Cohen 383
The Leo N. Levi Memorial Hospital.............................. 386
District No. I Accepts Wider Scope Quota.................. 387
Sholom Asch — By Sarah Goldberg................................. 389
The Printed Page................................................................. 392
News of the Lodges.............................................................. 393
Across the Seas..................................................................... 396
Humoresque............................................................................ 398
The Stirrings of New Life In Israel
THE news of Jewry used to be largely of drives
and of the generosity of its millionaires. To be a
Jew had to do largely with belonging to the local Jew¬
ish charity and paying the dues regularly. There was
little said of Jewish life, for it was taken for granted
that Jewish life did exist inasmuch as numbers of Jews
were seen to breathe, eat, walk and do business.
Jewish life was seldom thought of as being a cultural
aspiration or as a way of living. But suddenly there
was heard throughout Jewry in America, the questions,
"Are we alive?" and "What are we really here
for?" and "Do we exist only to be dues-paying mem¬
bers of societies for the relief of our poor?"
Perhaps history will record as one of the important
eras in the development of our people, the time when
Jewry began to ask itself questions.
We are still in the midst of this self-questioning.
* # #
Nor have we indulged merely in brooding introspec¬
tion, for Jewish life is seen today on the march. The
Jewish news reflects it. Whereas formerly, in its
broader activities, Jewry was merely a social agency,
today it is astir with cultural awakening.
Whereas formerly appeals to Jews had to do alto¬
gether with charity, we read today an appeal by Rabbi
S. Felix Mendelsohn of Chicago for the cultivation of
a love for Jewish books : '' We Jews are known as the
People of the Book. We have given to the world its
greatest book, the Bible, and the genius of our people
has always expressed itself in the writing of and love
for books. In the Ghetto a Jewish home without a col¬
lection of representative books was unthinkable. In
our day and in this country, however, we seem to be
losing our traditional attachment to the printed word.
There are Jewish homes where even the Bible and a set
of prayer books are not to be found."
-H- ^
Whereas once the Jew's efforts to preserve his life
were spent largely in protesting against those who
reviled him, today he is called upon to look at himself
and discover his own weaknesses.
Thus, in a stirring address before the B'nai B'rith
of New York, Rabbi Israel Mattuck of London, Eng¬
land, was heard to say: "I do not care what others
think of the Jew. But I care a tremendous lot what
the Jew thinks of himself."
He called for the enrichment of Jewish life, for the
cultivation of the Jewish inheritance.
In New York city Jewish life has taken to radio as
a means of animating the hearts of its people, and
every Monday evening there is a Jewish radio hour
under the auspices of "The Day," with a program of
Jewish music; and in that city also there has been
inaugurated the Menorah Jewish Forum to which are
brought the problems of Jewish life.
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"Jv Vr TV"
It is this month that B'nai B'rith, on the occasion
of Confirmations and Bar Mitzvahs, is making a wide
distribution of Jewish books among the children of its
members. The culture-conception of Jewish life com¬
prehends the home as the source of Jewish culture, as
the temple of Jewish life, a place for the preservation
of a love for Jewish tradition and Jewish songs and
Jewish books. -
With this in mind, B 'nai B 'rith is distributing books
of Jewish significance this month.
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These are stray notes on a movement in Jewry which
has advanced so swiftly and so suddenly that Jewry
itself is not yet fully conscious of it. But it remains
to be seen whether the Jews will accept the oppor¬
tunities to enrich their lives as Jews with the un¬
bounded enthusiasm with which they gave $25,000,000
for the lives of their European brethren.